18 Crops to Plant in July for a Late Summer and Fall Harvest

July might seem like a late start for planting, but it’s actually a perfect time to introduce a variety of crops to your garden. As summer hits its peak, there are still plenty of vegetables that can thrive when planted now, providing you with an abundant harvest well into the fall. Whether you want to extend your growing season or simply enjoy fresh produce, these crops will keep your garden productive and vibrant.

Green Beans

Green beans.
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Green beans are a quick-growing crop that can be planted in July and still produce a bountiful harvest. They thrive in warm soil and need plenty of sunlight. Choose bush varieties for a faster yield, as they typically mature in 50 to 60 days. Regular watering and harvesting will encourage continued production.

Beets

Beets.
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Beets are a versatile vegetable that can be planted in mid-summer for a fall harvest. They do well in cooler temperatures, so planting them in July allows them to mature as the weather begins to cool. Beets need well-drained soil and consistent moisture to develop properly. Both the roots and greens are edible and nutritious.

Carrots

Carrots.
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Carrots are another root vegetable that can be successfully planted in July but should be started no later than the middle of the month. They prefer cooler temperatures for germination, so providing some shade or planting them in a spot that receives afternoon shade can be beneficial. Carrots need loose, well-drained soil to grow straight and healthy, and they must be kept moist throughout germination.

Cabbage

Cabbage.
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Cabbage is a hardy vegetable that is best grown as a fall crop. Starting cabbage in July gives it ample time to mature before the first frost. It needs rich, well-drained soil and regular watering to thrive. The fall harvest of cabbage has been traditionally used to make sauerkraut in many European countries to last throughout the fall and winter months.

Radish

Radish.
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Radishes are one of the fastest-growing vegetables, with some varieties maturing in as little as 25 days. This makes them perfect for planting in July, as you can get multiple harvests before the growing season ends. They prefer cooler temperatures but can handle the summer heat with adequate moisture.

Lettuce

Lettuce.
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Lettuce grows quickly and can be planted throughout the summer for a continuous harvest. Opt for heat-tolerant varieties and provide some afternoon shade to prevent bolting. Lettuce needs well-drained soil and regular watering to stay crisp and tender.

Arugula

Arugula.
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Arugula is a leafy green that thrives in cooler temperatures but can be grown in the summer with some care. Planting in July allows for a fall harvest, and the spicy leaves can add a unique flavor to salads. It grows quickly and can be harvested as baby greens or mature leaves.

Spinach

Spinach.
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Spinach is another cool-weather crop that can be planted in July for a fall harvest. It prefers cooler temperatures and will bolt in extreme heat, so providing shade and consistent moisture is essential. Spinach can be harvested as baby greens or allowed to mature fully.

Broccoli

Broccoli.
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Broccoli is a cool-weather vegetable that can be started in July for a fall harvest. It needs rich, well-drained soil and plenty of sunlight. Broccoli requires consistent watering to develop large heads, and cooler fall temperatures help improve its flavor.

Kale

Kale.
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Kale is a hardy green that can be planted in July and will continue to produce into the fall and even winter in some regions. It prefers cooler temperatures and can handle light frosts, which can enhance its flavor. Kale needs well-drained soil and regular watering.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower.
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Cauliflower is similar to broccoli in its growing requirements. Starting cauliflower in July allows it to mature in the cooler fall weather. It needs rich soil and consistent moisture to develop large, white heads. Providing shade during extreme heat can help prevent bolting.

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts.
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Brussels sprouts have a long growing season and are typically planted in mid-summer for a fall harvest. They thrive in cooler temperatures and can withstand light frosts, which can improve their flavor. Brussels sprouts need rich, well-drained soil and regular watering.

Cucumbers

Cucumbers for pickling.
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Cucumbers are a fast-growing crop that can be planted in July for a late summer harvest. Choose varieties that mature quickly, such as bush or pickling cucumbers. They need plenty of sunlight, well-drained soil, and consistent moisture to produce crisp, tasty fruits.

Corn

Corn.
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Corn can be planted in July if you choose fast-maturing varieties. These types typically mature in 60 to 70 days, allowing for a late summer or early fall harvest. Corn needs full sun, well-drained soil, and regular watering to grow tall and produce full ears.

Turnips

Turnips.
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Turnips are a cool-weather root vegetable that can be planted in July for a fall harvest. They prefer well-drained soil and consistent moisture. Both the roots and greens are edible, providing a versatile addition to your garden.

Parsnips

Parsnips.
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Parsnips are a root vegetable that can be planted in mid-summer for a late fall or early winter harvest. They require a long growing season and develop their best flavor after a few frosts. Parsnips need loose, well-drained soil and regular watering.

Planting these crops in July can extend your growing season and provide a variety of fresh produce well into the fall. With proper care and attention, your garden can continue to thrive and yield delicious vegetables.

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