18 Veggies & Fruits You Can Still Sow in June for Big Harvests

Maybe you have already planted carrots, spinach, and lettuce, and your spring-planted vegetable garden is already producing. Planting more seeds now will create a vastly extended harvest period. We’re just under three weeks away from the longest day of the year, the summer solstice on June 21st, so the soil is warm enough to plant everything from squash and bean seeds to pumpkins and corn. Even in colder climates with frosty nights, the growing season is just around the corner.

If you haven’t started seeds — don’t despair and get to work. Here are the seeds you can still direct-sow in June for a bountiful harvest in due time.

Turnips

Turnips.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Turnips are fast-growing root vegetables that can be direct-sown in June for a fall harvest. Sow the seeds about 1/2 inch deep and 1-2 inches apart in rows spaced 12-18 inches apart. Thin the seedlings to 4-6 inches apart once they are a few inches tall to allow room for the roots to develop. Turnips are typically ready to harvest in 30 to 60 days from sowing.

Turnips prefer well-drained, fertile soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They grow best in full sun but can tolerate partial shade. Consistent moisture is important to prevent the roots from becoming tough and woody. Mulching around the plants helps retain soil moisture and keeps the soil cool. Harvest turnips when they are young and tender for the best flavor.

Beans

Green beans.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

My gardening philosophy — if there is a bare bit of dirt available, stick a bush bean in it. No matter the conditions, something delicious and nutritious will grow.

Beans are a versatile and easy-to-grow crop that can be direct-sown in June for a bountiful harvest. Sow the seeds about 1 inch deep and 4-6 inches apart in rows spaced 18-24 inches apart. Beans come in two main types: bush beans and pole beans. Bush beans grow in a compact form and do not require support, while pole beans are climbing plants that need trellises or poles. Beans are typically ready to harvest in 50 to 70 days from sowing, depending on the variety.

Beans prefer well-drained, fertile soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They thrive in full sun and need consistent moisture to produce a good crop. Mulching around the base of the plants helps retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Regularly check for pests like bean beetles and aphids, and remove any damaged leaves to keep the plants healthy. Harvest beans when they are young and tender for the best flavor.

Related: 14 Essential Tips for a Bountiful Bean Harvest This Season

Cucumbers

Cucumbers.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Cucumbers are a refreshing summer vegetable that can be direct-sown in June for a continuous harvest throughout the summer. Sow the seeds about 1/2 inch deep and 12 inches apart in rows spaced 3-4 feet apart. Cucumbers can be grown on the ground or trained to climb on trellises to save space and improve air circulation. Cucumbers are typically ready to harvest in 50 to 70 days from sowing, depending on the variety.

Cucumbers prefer well-drained, fertile soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They thrive in full sun and need consistent moisture to produce a good crop. Mulching around the base of the plants helps retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Regularly check for pests like cucumber beetles and aphids, and remove any damaged leaves to keep the plants healthy. Harvest cucumbers when they are firm, green, and crisp for the best flavor and texture.

Related: How To Grow Cucumbers In Raised Beds {Complete Guide}

Corn

Corn.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Corn is a warm-season crop that can be direct-sown in June for a late summer or early fall harvest. Sow the seeds about 1 inch deep and 8-12 inches apart in rows spaced 24-36 inches apart. Corn plants need plenty of space to grow and produce good-sized ears. Corn is typically ready to harvest in 60 to 100 days from sowing, depending on the variety.

Corn prefers well-drained, fertile soil with a pH between 6.0 and 6.8. It grows best in full sun and needs consistent moisture, especially during the flowering and ear development stages. Mulching around the base of the plants helps retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Corn is wind-pollinated, so planting in blocks rather than single rows improves pollination and ear development. Regularly check for pests like corn earworms and cutworms, and remove any damaged leaves to keep the plants healthy.

Related: How To Grow Corn In A Raised Bed {Maximum Yields}

Greens (Kale, Swiss Chard)

Kale.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Kale and Swiss chard are nutritious leafy greens that can be direct-sown in June for a continuous harvest throughout the summer and fall. Sow the seeds about 1/4 inch deep and 1 inch apart in rows spaced 12-18 inches apart. Thin the seedlings to 6-12 inches apart once they are a few inches tall. Kale and Swiss chard are typically ready to harvest in 50 to 70 days from sowing, depending on the variety.

Kale and Swiss chard prefer well-drained, fertile soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They grow best in full sun to partial shade, especially in warmer climates. Consistent moisture is important to prevent the leaves from becoming tough and bitter. Mulching around the plants helps retain soil moisture and keeps the soil cool. Harvest the leaves individually as needed, starting with the outer leaves and allowing the inner leaves to continue growing.

Related: 11 Insider Tips For a Bountiful Kale Harvest

Squash

Squash.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Squash, including both summer and winter varieties, can be direct-sown in June for a productive harvest. Sow the seeds about 1 inch deep and 2-3 feet apart in rows spaced 4-6 feet apart. Squash plants need plenty of space to grow and spread, so ensure they are adequately spaced to prevent overcrowding and promote air circulation. Summer squash is typically ready to harvest in 50 to 70 days, while winter squash takes 80 to 100 days.

Squash prefers rich, well-drained soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They thrive in full sun and need consistent moisture, especially during fruit development. Mulching around the base of the plants helps retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Regularly check for pests like squash bugs and cucumber beetles, and remove any damaged leaves to keep the plants healthy. Harvest squash when they are young and tender for summer varieties, and when the skins are hard and fully mature for winter varieties.

Related: 13 Unique Squash Varieties to Grow & Eat

Asparagus (Seed)

Asparagus.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Asparagus is a perennial vegetable that can be direct-sown from seed in June, though it requires patience as it takes a few years to establish and produce a harvest. Sow the seeds about 1/2 inch deep and 2-3 inches apart in rows spaced 18-24 inches apart. Thin the seedlings to 12-18 inches apart once they are a few inches tall. Asparagus is typically ready to harvest in 2-3 years from sowing.

Asparagus prefers well-drained, fertile soil with a pH between 6.5 and 7.5. It grows best in full sun and needs consistent moisture to establish strong roots. Mulching around the plants helps retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Once established, asparagus requires minimal maintenance and can produce a bountiful harvest for many years.

Related: Planting Asparagus Seeds: A Comprehensive Grow Guide

Green Onions

Green onions or bunching onions.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Scallions or green onions, can be direct-sown in June for a continuous harvest throughout the summer and fall. Sow the seeds about 1/4 inch deep and 1/2 inch apart in rows spaced 12 inches apart. Bunching onions can be harvested at various stages, from small green onions to larger scallions. Bunching onions are typically ready to harvest in 50 to 60 days from sowing.

Bunching onions prefer well-drained, fertile soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.0. They grow best in full sun to partial shade. Consistent moisture is important to promote healthy growth and prevent the bulbs from becoming tough. Mulching around the plants helps retain soil moisture and keeps the soil cool. Harvest bunching onions by pulling the entire plant from the ground or by cutting the tops and allowing the bulbs to regrow.

Melons

Melons.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Melons are warm-season fruits that can be direct-sown in June for a late summer or early fall harvest. Sow the seeds about 1 inch deep and 2-3 feet apart in rows that are 4-6 feet apart. Melon plants need plenty of space to grow and spread, so ensure they are adequately spaced to prevent overcrowding and promote air circulation. Melons are typically ready to harvest in 70 to 100 days from sowing, depending on the variety.

Melons prefer rich, well-drained soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They thrive in full sun and need consistent moisture, especially during fruit development. Mulching around the base of the plants helps retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Regularly check for pests like cucumber beetles and aphids, and remove any damaged leaves to keep the plants healthy. Harvest melons when they are fully ripe, indicated by a sweet aroma and a slight softening at the blossom end.

Related: 10 Melon Varieties to Grow for Refreshing Summertime Sweetness

Sunflowers

Sunflowers.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Sunflowers are tall, striking flowers that can be direct-sown in June for a late summer and fall display. Sow the seeds about 1 inch deep and 6-12 inches apart in rows spaced 24-36 inches apart. Sunflowers come in various heights and colors, making them a versatile addition to any garden. Sunflowers are typically ready to bloom in 70 to 100 days from sowing, depending on the variety.

Sunflowers prefer well-drained, fertile soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They thrive in full sun and need consistent moisture to support their rapid growth. Mulching around the base of the plants helps retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Regularly check for pests like aphids and sunflower beetles, and remove any damaged leaves to keep the plants healthy. Harvest sunflower seeds when the back of the flower heads turn brown and the seeds are plump and mature.

Related: 13 Tips To Grow Sunflowers for Beautiful Blooms & Tasty Seeds

Broccoli

Brocolli.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Broccoli is a cool-season crop that can still be direct-sown in June for a fall harvest. Broccoli plants produce a central head and several smaller side shoots, providing multiple harvests. Sow the seeds about 1/4 inch deep and 2-3 inches apart in rows spaced 18-24 inches apart. Thin the seedlings to 12-18 inches apart once they have a few true leaves. Broccoli is usually ready to harvest in 70 to 100 days from sowing.

Broccoli thrives in fertile, well-drained soil with a pH of 6.0-7.0. Regular watering is required to keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged. Mulching can help maintain soil moisture and temperature. Broccoli is susceptible to pests like cabbage worms and aphids, so monitor your plants and use appropriate organic pest control methods if needed. Fertilize with a balanced fertilizer to support healthy growth and head formation.

Related: 12 Growing Techniques For a Bountiful Broccoli Harvest

Pumpkins

Pumpkins.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Pumpkins are a popular warm-season crop that can be direct-sown in June for a fall harvest. Sow the seeds about 1 inch deep and 3-4 feet apart in rows spaced 6-8 feet apart. Pumpkins need plenty of space to grow and spread, so ensure they are adequately spaced to prevent overcrowding and promote air circulation. Pumpkins are typically ready to harvest in 90 to 120 days from sowing.

Pumpkins prefer rich, well-drained soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They thrive in full sun and need consistent moisture, especially during fruit development. Mulching around the base of the plants helps retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Regularly check for pests like squash bugs and cucumber beetles, and remove any damaged leaves to keep the plants healthy. Harvest pumpkins when they are fully mature, indicated by a hard skin and a hollow sound when tapped.

Related: 16 Must-Know Tips for Pumpkin Planting and Care

Zucchini

Zucchini.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Zucchini is a prolific summer squash that produces an abundance of tender fruits. Direct-sow zucchini seeds about 1 inch deep and 2-3 feet apart in rows that are 3-4 feet apart. Zucchini plants need plenty of space to grow, so ensure they are adequately spaced to prevent overcrowding and promote air circulation. Zucchini is generally ready to harvest in 45 to 55 days from sowing.

Zucchini prefers rich, well-drained soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They thrive in full sun and need consistent moisture, especially during fruit development. Mulching around the base of the plants helps retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Regularly check for pests like squash bugs and cucumber beetles, and remove any damaged leaves to keep the plants healthy. Harvest zucchini when they are about 6-8 inches long for the best flavor and texture.

Related: Grow Amazing Zucchini With These Advanced Tips and Secrets

Herbs

Herbs.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Herbs like basil, parsley, cilantro, and dill can be direct-sown in June for a continuous harvest throughout the summer and fall. Sow the seeds thinly, about 1/4 inch deep, and thin the seedlings to the recommended spacing for each herb. Herbs are typically ready to harvest in 50 to 70 days from sowing, depending on the variety.

Herbs prefer well-drained, fertile soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.0. They grow best in full sun but can tolerate partial shade. Consistent moisture is important to promote healthy growth and prevent the leaves from becoming bitter. Mulching around the plants helps retain soil moisture and keeps the soil cool. Harvest herbs by cutting the stems just above a pair of leaves to encourage bushy growth and continuous production.

Related: 14 Herbs to Grow if You Love Drinking Fresh Teas & Tisanes

Beets

Beets.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Beets are versatile root vegetables known for their earthy flavor and vibrant color. They can be harvested as baby beets or left to mature for larger roots. To direct-sow beet seeds in June, soak the seeds in water for a few hours before planting to speed up germination. Sow the seeds about 1/2 inch deep and 1 inch apart in rows spaced 12-18 inches apart. Thin the seedlings to 3-4 inches apart once they are a few inches tall to allow room for growth. Beets are typically ready to harvest in 55 to 70 days from sowing.

Beets prefer well-drained, loamy soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. Adding compost to the soil can improve fertility and drainage. They need consistent moisture, so water them regularly, especially during dry spells. Mulching around the plants can help retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. While relatively low-maintenance, keep an eye out for pests like leaf miners and diseases like powdery mildew.

Related: 15 Proven Tips For a Bountiful Beet Harvest

Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Nasturtiums are colorful and edible flowers that can be directly shown in June for a summer and fall display. Sow the seeds about 1/2 inch deep and 6-12 inches apart in rows or blocks. Nasturtiums are low-maintenance and can thrive in poor soil, making them a great addition to any garden. Nasturtiums are typically ready to bloom in 50 to 60 days from sowing.

Nasturtiums prefer well-drained soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They grow best in full sun to partial shade. While they can tolerate poor soil, adding compost can improve flowering. Consistent moisture is important, especially during dry spells. Mulching around the plants helps retain soil moisture and keeps the soil cool. Nasturtiums are great for attracting beneficial insects and can be used as companion plants to deter pests.

Parsnips

Parsnips freshly harvested and placed on the ground.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Parsnips are a hardy root vegetable that can be direct-sown in June for a fall and winter harvest. Sow the seeds about 1/2 inch deep and 1 inch apart in rows spaced 12-18 inches apart. Thin the seedlings to 3-4 inches apart once they are a few inches tall to allow room for the roots to develop. Parsnips are typically ready to harvest in 100 to 120 days from sowing.

Parsnips prefer well-drained, loamy soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. They grow best in full sun but can tolerate partial shade. Consistent moisture is important to promote healthy root development. Mulching around the plants helps retain soil moisture and keeps the soil cool. Harvest parsnips after the first frost for the best flavor, as the cold temperatures help convert starches to sugars.

Carrots

Carrots.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Carrots are a popular root vegetable that can be direct-sown in June for a late summer or fall harvest. Sow the seeds about 1/4 inch deep and 1-2 inches apart in rows spaced 12-18 inches apart. Thin the seedlings to 2-3 inches apart once they are a few inches tall to allow room for the roots to develop. Carrots are typically ready to harvest in 60 to 80 days from sowing.

Carrots prefer loose, sandy soil with good drainage and a pH between 6.0 and 7.0. They need consistent moisture to grow well, so water them regularly, especially during dry spells. Mulching around the plants helps retain soil moisture and keeps the roots cool. Carrots can be susceptible to pests like carrot flies and diseases like root rot, so monitor your plants and use appropriate organic pest control methods if needed.

Related: 15 Carrot Growing Secrets For Your Best Harvest Ever

Cabbage

Cabbage.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Cabbage is a hardy vegetable that can still be direct-sown in June for a fall harvest. Sow the seeds about 1/2 inch deep and 1 inch apart in rows spaced 12-18 inches apart. Thin the seedlings to 12-24 inches apart, depending on the variety, once they have a few true leaves. Cabbage is generally ready to harvest in 70 to 100 days from sowing.

Cabbage thrives in fertile, well-drained soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.5. It requires regular watering to keep the soil consistently moist but not waterlogged. Mulching can help maintain soil moisture and temperature. Cabbage is susceptible to pests like cabbage worms, aphids, and flea beetles, so monitor your plants and use appropriate organic pest control methods if needed. Fertilize with a balanced fertilizer to support healthy growth and head formation.

Related: This is How You Grow The Best Cabbage Ever

Lettuce

Lettuce plants growing in the pots displayed outside.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Lettuce is a fast-growing, cool-season crop that can be direct-sown in June for a quick and continuous harvest. Sow the seeds thinly, about 1/4 inch deep, and thin the seedlings to 6-12 inches apart, depending on the variety. Lettuce can be grown in rows or blocks to maximize space. Lettuce is typically ready to harvest in 30 to 50 days from sowing, depending on the variety.

Lettuce prefers well-drained, fertile soil with a pH between 6.0 and 7.0. It grows best in full sun to partial shade, especially in warmer climates. Consistent moisture is important to prevent the leaves from becoming bitter. Mulching around the plants helps retain moisture and keeps the soil cool. Harvest lettuce leaves individually as needed or cut the entire plant at the base for a full head.

Related: Effortlessly Grow an Endless Salad Garden All Season Long

June Garden Tasks

Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Learn More: June Garden Tasks: 15 Things You Probably Should’ve Done Last Week

Vegetables That Can Thrive in Shade

Radish salad served on a plate with forks and a tablecloth.
Photo Credit: Envato Elements.

Learn More: 32 Vegetables You Can Grow in Partial Shade

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *