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Raw Cream Cultured Butter or Sweet Cream Butter Recipe | Traditional European Butter Techniques

This is the second post in my Raw Milk Cheesemaking 101 (For Beginners & Beyond) Series of Free Classes (Videos & Articles).

Today is all about one of the greatest pleasures in life — butter, real butter. Traditional, homemade butter.

And more so, I’ll be showing you how to make traditional European-style butter that is made with cultured raw cream.

If you don’t have access to raw cream, you can use pasteurized cream instead, but we won’t be culturing it first — rather, it will just be churned into equally delicious sweet butter. All of the steps will be the same, save for the very first one.

See the recipe here: Traditional Irish Soda Bread With Einkorn Wheat & Cultured Raw Buttermilk

  • Author: The Peasant's Daughter
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 1 lbs 1x
  • Category: Condiment
  • Method: Fermented
  • Cuisine: European
  • Diet: Gluten Free

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 litre of raw cream, or 1 litre of pasteurized cream (not UHT)
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt (Optional and not iodized)

Special Equipment:

  • Hand-mixer (my personal choice but you can also use a stand mixer, blender, traditional butter churn, or a whisk and your own strength.)

Instructions

For Making Raw Cultured Butter From Raw Cream

Leave your cream out on your counter at room temperature, covered, for 24 hours before proceeding to the following steps.

For Making Sweet Cream Butter From Pasteurized OR Unpasteurized Cream

Do not leave your cream out for any length of time. Simply do the following:

  1. Take your raw cultured or uncultured sweet cream and place it into a large bowl.
  2. Using a handheld mixer on medium-high speed, beat the cream.
  3. You will eventually (10ish minutes) get whipped cream, keep going.
  4. After about 10-15 minutes, the whipped cream will separate into yellow fat butter globules and a milky-yellow liquid. Keep going for a couple more minutes until the fat is well separated.
  5. Using a colander, strain out the buttermilk from the butter into another bowl. Using a wooden spoon, continue to get out as much of the buttermilk as possible.
  6. Using either your hands or a wide silicon spatula, wash your butter well under cold running water, kneading and squishing it well.
  7. The cold of the water will firm up the butter making this part easier, and eventually, your water will run clear and not cloudy, meaning that the buttermilk has been well and properly extracted. I prefer to do the washing in another bowl under constant running water.
  8. Add your salt (optional) to the butter and mix it well with our hands.
  9. Store your butter refrigerated for up to 3 weeks, or frozen for up to 1 year.

 

Nutrition

Keywords: butter, homemade butter, raw butter, raw milk, cultured butter, raw milk, grass-fed butter, sweet cream butter